REVALUATION OF THE INDIAN MYTHOLOGY.

Dec 2, 2019 by Kreena Shah #Books ,#Inspiration

REVALUATION OF THE INDIAN MYTHOLOGY
A PEEP INTO THE RISING GENRE OF MYTHOLOGICAL FICTION

Indian mythology is a treasure of interesting and philosophical stories which strive to teach men the ideal way of living. Sadly, people fail to see their and take them at their face value. Hence the stories do not change with time leaving them non relatable and unrealistic for the modern generation.

This leads to either revocation of faith or blind reverence and superstition two extremities which should be avoided at all costs. In the recent past, the modern generation has tried to dive back into mythology in the search of their roots and managed to understand the true essence of our epics and vedas.

This has given rise to a new genre of literature in India- MYTHOLOGICAL FICTION. Writers under this genre have tried to analyse the old epics under fresh perspectives and more realistic and relatable versions of the age old stories.

THE SHIVA TRILOGY and THE RAMCHANDRA SERIES by Amish.

Amish Tripathi, is a banker turned author who made his debut in 2010 with his book “The Immortals Of Meluha” and in no time made it to the best seller charts. He believes “Myths are nothing but jumbled memories of a true past. A past buried under mounds of earth and ignorance.”

All of his six books are based on the radical idea that all gods were once human beings and their noble deeds established them as gods in their society. He carefully analyses the long standing beliefs and uses his imagination to not only present a believable but also a relatable picture of mythology.

2) ASURA– The tale of the Vanquished & AJAYA– epic of the Kaurava Clan by Anand Neelakantan.

Neelakantan is known for voicing the stories of the voiceless. He beautifully paints the picture of a protagonist who with all his flaws and imperfections is a mere human being. He justifies the perspective of two of the most celebrated villains of Hindu mythology, Raavan and Duryodhan in his books.

Both the books provide their readers a fresh peek into the two Hindu epics and tell them the other side of the story. They try to raise the question that, ‘Is it all black and white, or are there specks of grey in all humans?’

3) PALACE OF ILLUSIONS by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni.

Indian Mythology is often considered to be misogynistic. All are epics are dominated by the voices of it’s male characters and females are projected as weak puppets.

Hence Banerjee takes it upon herself to voice the plight of one of the most misunderstood characters of Hindu mythology- Draupadi. She successfully projects an image of Draupadi that defies, her pre-established image as a vain, conceited, weak and arrogant young woman.

She shows Draupadi as a strong, intelligent and ambitious woman who finds herself surrounded by war and betrayal. She helplessly watches as her life mocks her and she gets trapped in a web of deceit just because she ever dreamt of creating history.

4) KARNA’S WIFE & LANKA’S PRINCESS by Kavita Kane.

Adamant on voicing the plight of women in our epics, Kavita Kane’s books focus on the unknown and misunderstood female characters who find scant mentions in our mythology, like Uruvi, wife of Karna, who was brave enough to choose a life of hardships by marrying an outcast, and Surpanakha, sister of Raavan, who was overshadowed by her brothers and neglected by her parents, turned bitter by the hatred of her loved ones and is hated till today as vile and ugly witch who perpetuated a war.